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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 1  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 14-19

Physicians’ attitudes towards pharmaceutical promotions and their trustworthiness towards pharmaceutical representatives’ information on new drugs


1 Community and Maternity Health Nursing Unit, College of Nursing, University of Duhok, Iraqi Kurdistan, Duhok, Iraq
2 Public Health Department, Faculty of Health and Environmental Sciences, School of Public Health and Interdisciplinary Studies, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand

Correspondence Address:
Deldar Morad Abdulah
Community and Maternity Health Nursing Unit, College of Nursing, University of Duhok, Iraqi Kurdistan, Nakhoshkhana Road, Duhok 42001
Iraq
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/JIMPH.JIMPH_3_21

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BACKGROUND: The interaction between physicians and the pharmaceutical industry through their sales representatives influences physicians’ attitudes and prescribing behaviors. In this regard, physicians’ attitudes towards pharmaceutical promotions and their trustworthiness towards pharmaceutical representatives’ information on new drugs were explored in this study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The present study was an analysis of a cross-sectional survey of 183 physicians with different job and education designations and from various clinical settings in Erbil-Iraqi Kurdistan in July 2018. The physicians were invited from the public sector, comprising a general, emergency, and pediatric hospital. The information was collected through a standardized anonymous, self-administered close-ended questionnaire. The questionnaire included exposure to marketing activities, motivations to contact pharmaceutical representatives, attitudes towards promotional practices, and trustworthiness of the pharmaceutical representatives’ information on new drugs. RESULTS: The majority of the physicians reported that the information provided by pharmaceutical representatives assisted them in staying up to date or learning about new products (76.5%), but 55.7% of them trusted their medical information. In addition, most of them reported that pharmaceutical representatives prioritized the promotion of their products over patients’ benefits (70.5%). They reported that receiving promotional material and participating in promotional practices affect doctors’ behaviors to prescribe a new drug, including promotional materials (55.2%); medical samples (67.8%); funding of registration costs to conferences (60.1%); participation in industry-funded researches (69.9%); and continuing medical education (69.4%). Receiving promotional materials and participating in promotional activities were considered to be ethical. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that doctors approved that receiving promotional material and participating in promotional practices affect doctors’ behaviors to prescribe a new drug. The present study showed that most of the physicians reported the role of promotional materials and activities on physicians’ behaviors to prescribe new drugs.


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